3 Super Simple Bread Recipes for the Bread Machine

Nothing makes a house smell more delicious than a loaf of fresh baked bread.  

But all that kneading?  And then the waiting?  And then back to more kneading?  It's a bit overwhelming.  

Enter: my trusty friend, the bread machine.  

Now don't get me wrong, homemade bread from scratch has a taste that cannot be beat.  Something about the physical work of kneading the dough makes for an extra tasty loaf.

Umm, yea. See how that one bread is missing a slice? Right. That's the buttermilk cheese bread. And I ate it. Sorry, guys. Perks of the job.

Buuuuut, when you're in the mood for fresh-baked bread and you're feeling, um...lazy; the bread machine is your best tool.  

Here are my 3 go-to bread machine recipes.  They are unique and delectable [and easy!] bread recipes that are sure to spice up that dull turkey and cheese.  

Scroll down for recipes.

Dakota Bread

This bread is loaded with seeds and grains and is extra hearty.  Bulgur is a quick-cooking grain, so there's no need to precook it before the mix.  It will puff up and blend in during the long mixing and rise times.  Try it with smoked turkey, mayo, avocado, tomato and lettuce or simply toasted plain with butter.


Dry:

2 7/8 c bread flour

1 c whole wheat flour

1/3 c raw bulgar cracked wheat

1 tbsp gluten

2 tsp salt

1/3 c raw sunflower seeds

1/3 c raw pumpkin seeds, chopped

2 tsp sesame seeds

2 tsp poppy seeds

2 1/4 tsp SAF yeast or 2 3/4 tsp bread machine yeast

Wet:

1 5/8 c water

3 tbsp canola oil

3 tbsp honey

 


Place ingredients in the pan in the order listed on the instructions for your bread machine. Set the loaf size to 2 pounds, set the crust to dark and set the program to Basic Cycle.  Hit Start.

When the baking cycle ends, immediately and carefully remove the hot pan from the machine and the bread from the pan.  Allow to cool on a rack to room temperature before slicing.

Yogurt Bread

Light and slightly spongey, this bread has a slight sourness to it that resembles sourdough without the all the work of having to use a bread starter.  The crust is softer and lighter which also makes it a stellar sandwich bread.  


Dry:

4 3/4 c bread flour

1 tbsp + 1 tsp gluten

2 1/4 tsp salt

2 1/2 tsp SAF yeast or 1 tbsp bread machine yeast

Wet:

1 c water

1 1/3 c plain whole milk yogurt


Place ingredients in the pan in the order listed on the instructions for your bread machine. When adding the bread flour, start with 4 1/2 cups.  The remaining 1/4 cup can be sprinkled over the dough ball as needed (some stickiness is ok, but if the dough ball is looking too sticky then add in a little of the bread flour).  Set the loaf size to 2 pounds, set the crust to dark and set the program to Basic Cycle.  Hit Start.

When the baking cycle ends, immediately and carefully remove the hot pan from the machine and the bread from the pan.  Allow to cool on a rack to room temperature before slicing.

Buttermilk Cheese Bread

This one is my faaaaavorite and it is actually baking right now as I write.  I hope I don't drool on my keyboard.  Cheesy, bready goodness - that's the only way to describe this one.  Denser and richer than the yogurt bread, it is obvious that there was more fat used in this one.  Watch out - you'll want to eat the whole thing plain right out of the pan.  


Dry:

4 1/2 c bread flour

1 1/4 c (5 oz) shredded swiss cheese

2 tbsp sugar

1 1/2 tsp baking powder

2 tsp salt

2 1/2 tsp SAF yeast or 1 tbsp bread machine yeast

Wet:

1 1/4 c buttermilk

2/3 water


Place ingredients in the pan in the order listed on the instructions for your bread machine. Set the loaf size to 2 pounds, set the crust to medium and set the program to Basic Cycle.  Hit Start.

When the baking cycle ends, immediately and carefully remove the hot pan from the machine and the bread from the pan.  Allow to cool on a rack to room temperature before slicing.


This post appeared first on Everyday Enthusiastic.  All ideas in this post are of my own opinions including any mention of companies and/or affiliate sites.  No sponsorships were involved in the creation of this post.  Photographs taken by Meredith Wheeler using a DSLR Canon Rebel T3 and edited using Photoshop CC.